Seismic | laboratory visit to Cal Tech

Following transatlantic email correspondence it was great to spend time with Professor Rob Clayton and have a tour of the laboratories at Cal Tech

Incase of an earthquake  - please adopt this advice: Drop! Cover! HOLD ON!

Incase of an earthquake  - please adopt this advice: Drop! Cover! HOLD ON!

When the ground beneath us shifts, as it is prone to do in Los Angeles, it unleashes enormous quantities of energy as seismic waves. Packing a destructive punch, these waves race through the earth like sound waves through air. In fact, seismic waves bear many remarkable similarities to sound waves. But though we feel them as earthquakes, we can’t hear them; their frequencies are simply too low for the human ear to detect. What if we transposed earthquake waves to an audible frequency? My aim is to bring these normally inaudible seismic sounds to life, how do seismic waves affect the built environment? Is it feasible to create a way of using seismic data to create musical interpretations?

Live monitor showing exact locations of seismic activity. A reassuring thought that Universities across the world are sharing information to understand seismic activity. Below a huge slice of time showing the variety of earth sediments and how they have been affected by San Andreas Fault line.

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